Decisions, Groups and Networks
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Invited Speakers

Skyler Cranmer is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). He is also an Alexander von Humboldt fellow at the University of Konstanz in Germany. He got his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. His research focuses on network science, particularly the role of topology in modeling complex networks and forecasting their evolution. His goal in these efforts is to develop network based theories, innovative statistical methods for network analysis, and policy relevant predictions. Thereby, the areas of application are eclectic, ranging from international politics to neuroscience. For more information, visit his website.

Ulrike Hahn is a Professor at the Department of Psychological Sciences at Birbeck, University of London, and Anneliese Maier Research Awardee at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). Before coming to Birbeck, she was a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Warwick and at Cardiff University. She did her DPhil in the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford. Her research involves both experiments and modeling, and is presently focused on interlinked areas, such as argumentation, judgment and decision-making, concepts and concept acquisition, as well as language and language acquisition. She is presently a member of the Senior Editorial Board for Topics in Cognitive Science and an Associate Editor for Frontiers in Cognitive Science. For more information, visit her website.

Stephan Hartmann is Chair of Philosophy of Science in the Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and the Study of Religion at LMU Munich, Alexander von Humboldt Professor, and Co-Director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). Before coming to Munich, he was Chair in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science and Director of the Tilburg Center for Logic and Philosophy of Science and a Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics. His current research interests include formal social epistemology (especially models of deliberation, norm emergence, and pluralistic ignorance), the philosophy and psychology of reasoning, intertheoretic relations, and (imprecise) probabilities in quantum mechanics. For more information, visit his website.

Catherine Herfeld is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) at LMU Munich. Before joining the MCMP, she was a research fellow at the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University, after she got her PhD in history and philosophy of economics at Witten/Herdecke University. Her current research interest include explanation in the social sciences (especially questions of reductionism and explanations of complex phenomena), historical network analysis, questions about innovations and their diffusion in science (esp. diffusion of scientific theories), and the history of rational choice theory in economics and related social sciences in the post-war era. For more information, visit her website.

Bernhard Kittel is Professor for Economic Sociology and Head of the Department of Economic Sociology at the University of Vienna. Before coming to Vienna, he was Professor of Methods of Empirical Social Research for Sociology and Political Science at the Universities of Oldenburg and Amsterdam. His research interests include experimental research about board decision-making and election research, the international comparative analysis of welfare states and industrial relations, as well as the social economics of language. His recent publications address questions about decision making in networks, communication and voting in multiparty elections, and the dynamics of political protest. For more information, visit his website.

Martin Kocher is Professor for Behavioral and Experimental Economics and Head of the Department of Economics at LMU Munich. Before coming to Munich, he was professor of Behavioral and Experimental Economics at the University of East Angelina, Researcher at the University of Amsterdam and Assistant Professor at the University of Innsbruck, where he also earned his PhD and his habilitation. His research interests include Behavioral Economics, Experimental Economics, and Economics of Sports. The research undertaken at his chair concerns the behavior of individuals in auctions, on collective decision-making, on the design of contracts in principal-agent relationships, or on situations in which one can choose between cooperation and conflict. For more information, visit his website.

Aidan Lyon an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Maryland, College Park and a Humboldt Research Fellow at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) at LMU Munich. His areas of research include philosophy of science, philosophy of probability, philosophy of mathematics, social epistemology and formal epistemology, as well as methods of human judgment aggregation. His current research concerns topics at the intersection between epistemology and psychology, such as the so-called "wisdom of crowds" effect. He also works on judgment elicitation and aggregation, where he draws heavily upon on empirical work. For more information, visit his website.

Friederike Mengel is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Essex and at Maastricht University. She got her PhD from the University of Alicante. Much of her research is on (Evolutionary) Game Theory and Learning with a particular interest in learning across games and categorization as well as models of (bounded) rationality more generally. Another focus of her research is the study of behaviour in social networks and the emergence of social norms, especially the way people learn, form beliefs, and make decisions in networks. Recently she also started to work on repeated games and on the formation of preferences. She uses mostly theory and lab or field experiments as well as occasionally simulations. For more information, visit her website.

Andreas Mojzisch is Professor for Social Psychology at the University of Hildesheim. He got his PhD from LMU Munich and has been Assistant Professor at the Technical University Dresden and the Georg-August-University Goettingen. His research interests concern group decision-making and group judgments, social psychological issues around work and health, questions about social identity and stress, as well as social neuroscience. For more information, visit his website.

Paul Thurner is Professor for Empirical Political Science and Policy Analysis at the Faculty of Social Sciences at LMU Munich. Before coming to Munich, he was professor at the Universities of Speyer and Bamberg and Lecturer at the University of St. Gallen, the University of Konstanz and the University of Mannheim, where he earned his PhD. His research interest include modeling of voting behavior and participation, political network analysis, where he is interested in energy policy, health policy and foreign policy, as well as trans-governmental cooperation. For more information, visit his website.

Anja Tuschke holds the chair of Strategic Management at the Munich School of Management at LMU Munich. Prior to joining the Munich School of Management, she was director at the Institute of Organization and HR Management at the University of Bern in Switzerland. Her research interests revolve around the link between strategic management, corporate governance and performance. She is particularly interested in how networks, top management compensation, and interactions of managers, boards and owners affect strategic outcomes. For more information, visit her website.